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How Much Caffeine is Too Much?

The consumption of caffeine has become prevalent in adults, teens and children across the country. It is found in soda, coffee, tea, chocolate, energy drinks and several other products we consume every day. Caffeine is defined as a drug because it acts as a stimulant for the central nervous system.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children should not consume caffeine. If adolescents do drink caffeine, it is recommended that they intake no more than 100 milligrams (mg) per day. Higher doses can cause adverse reactions.

  • 12 oz can of Coca-Cola® = 46 mg
  • 5 oz cup of coffee = 60-180 mg
  • 12 oz glass of iced tea = 67-76 mg

In adults, low doses of caffeine can be used to enhance one’s ability to focus, but any amount over 100 mg actually creates the opposite effect.

Some adverse reactions to caffeine are:

  • Jitters
  • Anxiety
  • Nausea
  • Increased urination (over 500 mg of caffeine)
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Increased heart rate
  • Tremors
  • Seizures (over 1 gram of caffeine)

“In 2015-2016, the Regional Poison Control Center (RPCC) at Children’s of Alabama received an average of 110 calls per year regarding adverse reactions to caffeine,” said Becky Rozier, MSN, RN, CSPI, RPCC educator. “The highest number of caffeine calls came from parents of 1- to 2-year-olds who had unintentionally consumed caffeine. The second highest came from 13- to 19-year-olds and the third highest came from 6- to 12-year-olds. Both of these groups had intentionally consumed the caffeine.”

Food and Drug Administration regulation:

  • Limits sodas to 71 mg per 12 oz
  • Limits caffeine tablets to 200 mg per tablet
  • Does not regulate energy drinks

“There are true dangers to caffeine,” said Ann Slattery, DrPH, RN, RPh, CSPI, DABAT, RPCC managing director. “Educate your children and teens to closely look at the amount of caffeine listed on the labeling. For example, some energy drinks include herbals that contain caffeine (guarana, kola nut and yerba mate), but are not included in the amount of caffeine listed.”

If your child is experiencing adverse reactions to caffeine or you have a question about toxicity, call the RPCC at 1-800-222-1222. A specialist will calculate the amount of caffeine ingested versus the body weight of the individual. The RPCC is available for all ages, 24/7/365.

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