Browsing Category

Children’s

Children's, News

Children’s of Alabama President, CEO Mike Warren Announces Retirement; Tom Shufflebarger Named New CEO

Mike Warren
Mike Warren

BIRMINGHAM (April 15, 2021) – Mike Warren, president and chief executive officer of Children’s of Alabama, is retiring from the state’s only freestanding pediatric hospital, effective June 1, 2021.

Warren, who has served as CEO at Children’s since January 2008, will be succeeded by Tom Shufflebarger, currently serving as chief operating officer and senior executive vice president. The announcements were made by the hospital’s board of directors today.

“Together, we have accomplished a great deal over these past 13 years, the crown jewel of which is the Benjamin Russell Hospital for Children. That addition transformed our campus and allowed us to move transplant surgery and cardiovascular services to Children’s – truly making us a comprehensive pediatric medical facility. Along the way we greatly expanded many services, making tremendous progress in fulfilling our mission to the children and families of Alabama. With Tom set to take the helm, Children’s is positioned to achieve even greater things,” Warren said.

“Under Mike’s leadership, Children’s has thrived, and we are grateful for his service. We are confident in Tom’s ability to continue to carry out the mission of Children’s and guide the organization as a leader in pediatric healthcare here in the state, the region and beyond,” said Temple Tutwiler III, chairman, Children’s Board of Trustees.

Shufflebarger joined Children’s in 1992, having previously served as the budget director and director of physician recruitment and development for Brookwood Medical Center. At Children’s, Shufflebarger has managed the hospital’s daily operations and policy decisions. He also directs the operations and development of Children’s Physician Services, including Pediatric Practice Solutions (Children’s primary care practices), Hospital Ambulatory Care Services, and business relationships with Health Services Foundation and hospital-based physicians.

Tom Shufflebarger
Tom Shufflebarger

Shufflebarger is an honors graduate of Duke University where he earned both a Bachelor of Arts in economics and a Master of Business Administration. He is a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives and has served as a Trustee of the Alabama Chapter of the American Hospital Association. He currently serves as chairman of the Child Health Patient Safety Organization, an affiliate of the Children’s Hospital Association. Active in numerous community organizations, he has served in volunteer leadership roles with the United Way of Central Alabama, American Red Cross, Magic Moments, the Lakeshore Foundation, Riverchase United Methodist Church and Hoover City Schools.

“I am honored to be named the next CEO of Children’s of Alabama,” Shufflebarger said. “It is a humbling experience to be part of the strong legacy of providing care for ill and injured children from throughout the region. As the past year has taught us, Children’s of Alabama stands ready to face the challenges of modern healthcare, while remaining firmly dedicated to providing the highest standards of care for our patients and their families.”

Under Warren’s leadership, Children’s of Alabama has grown both in size and standing.

In May 2009, the hospital broke ground on an expansion that would become the Benjamin Russell Hospital for Children. The 12-story building was designed to accommodate projected growth in patient volume, anticipated medical technology needs and the planned consolidation of pediatric services including cardiovascular surgery and comprehensive solid organ transplant care. The $400 million facility opened to patients in August 2012.

In 2010, six of the hospital’s programs were ranked for the first time among the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. The most recent ranking released in June 2020 marked the 11th consecutive year that Children’s has been included.

The relationship between Children’s and the University of Alabama at Birmingham strengthened under Warren’s leadership as the two institutions worked together to offer world-class pediatric health services in an environment that fosters world-class research, excellence in medical education and access to leading-edge treatments for pediatric illnesses and injuries.

Warren has long been a leader in Birmingham’s business community, previously serving as chairman and chief executive officer of Energen Corporation and its two primary subsidiaries, Alagasco and Energen Resources. Prior to that, Warren practiced law with the Birmingham firm of Bradley, Arant, Rose & White. Warren served 22 years on the Children’s of Alabama board of trustees before he was named the hospital’s CEO. He has been in involved in many state and local efforts and served as chairman of the Business Council of Alabama, the United Way, Leadership Birmingham and Leadership Alabama. He has also been chairman of the Metropolitan Development Board, and the area American Heart Association. He has twice chaired the general campaign for the United Way and the United Negro College Fund. In 2004, Warren was inducted to the Alabama Academy of Honor.

Since 1911, Children’s of Alabama has provided specialized medical care for ill and injured children. Ranked among the best children’s hospitals in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, Children’s serves patients from every county in Alabama and nearly every state. With more than 3.5 million square feet, it is one of the largest pediatric medical facilities in the United States. Children’s offers inpatient and outpatient services at its Russell Campus on Birmingham’s historic Southside with additional specialty services provided at Children’s South, Children’s on 3rd and in Huntsville and Montgomery. Primary medical care is provided in more than a dozen communities across central Alabama. Children’s is the only health system in Alabama dedicated solely to the care and treatment of children. It is a private, not-for-profit medical center that serves as the teaching hospital for the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) pediatric medicine, surgery, psychiatry, research and residency programs. The medical staff consists of UAB faculty and Children’s full-time physicians as well as private practicing community physicians.

Children's

Inclement Weather Updates

March 25, 2021 12:30 p.m.

Due to the potential for severe weather in the area, the following office locations will be closed for the remainder of the day.

  • Greenvale Pediatrics (Hoover, Alabaster, Brook Highland)
  • Vestavia Pediatrics
  • Mayfair Medical Group
  • Pediatrics West (Bessemer, McAdory)

Most locations will still have a physician on call for urgent medical needs. Please call your child’s pediatrician’s after hours number or answering service to be connected to a doctor.

If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. 

March 25, 2021 – 9:30 a.m.

We are monitoring today’s severe weather forecast. Any information about office closings will be posted here and to childrensal.org/weather throughout the day.

If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. 

Children's, Health and Safety

Poisonings: Prepare, Prevent, Protect

Your home should be a safe place for your family, but there are actually many hidden dangers. Our homes are filled with poisonous substances. Knowing the dangers and how to prevent them can keep kids safe.
Ann Slattery is the director of the Alabama Poison Information Center at Children’s of Alabama. She says parents and grandparents should do their part to “Prepare, Prevent, and Protect” kids against accidental poisoning.

PREPARE
Prepare now for the possible event of poisoning. Slattery recommends saving the toll free number for the Alabama Poison Information Center in your phone to keep it close at hand at all times. The number is 1-800-222-1222. Also, she recommends every home have a carbon monoxide detector, and that adults should prepare a list of all medications. “For adults we say have a list of your everyday medications available in case you have to call the poison center,” she said.

PREVENT
Act now to prevent the risk of poisoning. Store all cleaning products up and out of reach of children. Slattery also recommends storing prescription medicine in lock boxes. “Make sure you have child resistant closures on your medications,” she said. “Remember there is no such thing as child proof.” Slattery advises to remember this risk when visitors are in the home. You never know what guests may have in their bags, so store purses and suitcases out of reach or behind locked doors and away from children.

PROTECT
In the unfortunate event that an exposure does occur, call the Alabama Poison Information Center immediately at 1-800-222-1222. Slattery advises that if the individual is unconscious, having trouble breathing or experiencing a seizure to instead call 911 immediately.

By taking the proper precautions now, you can help keep children safe from the risk of poisoning. But if an accident does happen, be prepared to act quickly in the event of an emergency.

Children's, Development

Screen Time and Teens: The Hidden Pandemic

Screen Time and Teens

While the world has been focused on the COVID-19 pandemic, an underlying, hidden pandemic has been growing – screen time among teenagers. Some studies show that teens spend close to nine hours a day online, ranging from being on the phone, watching TV or playing video games. Approximately three-quarters of teens own a smartphone and half of them feel addicted to using their phones. Fortunately, there are proactive ways for parents to tackle this issue including establishing screen time limits for their teens.

Since many students have been doing online school, they have more time to scroll aimlessly through social media and spend hours on their phones. Some parents are working from home while others are working in the office, so their attention is not often geared toward their teens’ screen time. Free time among teenagers can often breed unhealthy habits if gone unchecked.

Neuropsychologist at Children’s of Alabama, Dr. Dan Marullo, offers insights on teens partaking in too much screen time. “Too much screen time in teens can lead to comparison to others and belief that their life is not as good as the people they follow,” Marullo said.

The false ideal of perfection on social media contributes to low self-esteem and eventually could develop into mental health disorders, including anxiety and depression, if not addressed.

Too much screen time in teens interferes with physical activity, homework, sleep, social activities with friends and time spent with family. It also can lead to attention problems, a higher incidence of depression, anxiety and exposure to unsafe content and contacts. Screen time can lead to obesity due to increased sedentary activity, mindless eating and interference with normal sleeping patterns. Lack of sleep contributes to problems with mood, attention and learning.

Some phone activities can be productive, including researching for a school project, engaging in creative outlets or interacting with friends on online platforms. However, many activities are unproductive or harmful for teens, including visiting unsafe websites, playing violent video games, watching inappropriate TV shows, sexting and engaging with strangers who pose a threat online. Cyberbullying, which is using the internet, cell phone or other technology to send texts or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person, can be an outcome of too much screen time as well.

Dr. Marullo suggests monitoring and limiting your teen’s screen time to no more than a couple hours per day outside of schoolwork. 

Parents should remember these tips when forming a healthy screen time habit for their teens:

  • Monitor social media sites, apps and browsing history.
  • Research video and computer games before letting your teen get them. Preview games with your teen to see what they are like.
  • Review or reset the phone location and privacy settings.
  • Follow or friend your teen on social media sites or get a trusted adult friend to do so.
  • Ensure your teen has a wide range of free-time activities (spending time with friends, playing sports, volunteer work, being involved in school clubs, etc.). Less free time can lead to less time spent on screens!
  • Turn off all screens during family meals and when your teen goes to bed. Keep devices with screens out of your teen’s room after bedtime.
  • Know your teen’s usernames and passwords.
  • Consider screen time a special privilege that teens need to earn, not a right to which they are entitled.
  • Stay up to date on the latest apps, social media platforms and digital slang.
  • Use screening tools for phones, TV, tablets and computers to limit access to certain content.
  • Teach your teen about internet and social media safety, ensuring they know the dangers of sharing private information online or sexting.
  • Teach positive, respectful digital behavior.
  • Keep the computer in a common area so you can monitor their online activity.
Children's

Inclement Weather Updates 3/17/2021

We are monitoring today’s severe weather forecast. Any information about office closings will be posted here and http://www.childrensal.org/weather throughout the day.

March 17, 2:30 p.m.

Due to the potential for severe weather in the area, the following office locations will be closed for the remainder of the day.

  • Pell City Pediatrics
  • Greenvale Pediatrics (Hoover, Alabaster, Brook Highland)
  • Vestavia Pediatrics
  • Over the Mountain Pediatrics

Most locations will still have a physician on call for urgent medical needs. Please call your child’s pediatrician’s after hours number or answering service to be connected to a doctor.

If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. 

March 17, 2021 – 2 p.m. 

Due to the potential for severe weather in the area, the following office locations will be closed for the remainder of the day.

  • Pediatrics West, both locations
  • Midtown Pediatrics (patient families can call the answering service at 205-930-4151 to speak to the physician on call)

Children's

Fever

Parents can understandably be concerned when their child doesn’t feel well and has a fever. But how high is too high? When should a parent treat a fever at home and when should they seek medical help?

Dr. Mark Baker is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Children’s of Alabama and works in the Emergency Department. He says a fever is anything higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit. “Fever is the body’s response to an infection,” he says. “Fevers are generally well tolerated in healthy children, especially if they are up to date with recommended childhood vaccines.” 

Dr. Baker says there are instances when a parent should take a fever seriously and seek medical attention. These include when a child has a temperature higher than 100.4 AND:

  • Is 3 months of age or younger
  • Has serious underlying medical problems
  • Experiences pain or other concerns

If any of these conditions exist, parents are encouraged to take their child to the Emergency Department. If a parent is unsure how serious the situation may be, their child’s pediatrician is available to help. Even after hours, a pediatrician’s office has a 24/7 on call line.

Dr. Baker says in an otherwise healthy child, a fever can usually be treated at home with either ibuprofen or acetaminophen, (Motrin or Tylenol). He says it is best to stick with one form of treatment and follow the dosage instructions. If the over the counter medicine isn’t helping, Dr. Baker advises parents to call their child’s pediatrician or go to the Emergency Department.

Parents can also make sure their child is more comfortable by dressing them in lightweight clothing and covering them with a light sheet or blanket. It’s very important that the child gets plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. A sponge bath or wet cloth may help lower their temperature and make them feel more comfortable. All kids get fevers, and in most cases recover completely within a few days. But if you ever have concerns about your child’s well-being, it’s best to contact their doctor for guidance.

Children's

Weather Updates

Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021 – 9:50 a.m.

The following locations will be closed on Tuesday, Feb. 16. 

  • Greenvale Pediatrics (Alabaster, Brook Highland and Hoover) 
  • Pediatrics East
  • Pediatrics West
  • Pell City Pediatrics
  • North Alabama Children’s Specialists
  • Mayfair Medical Group
  • Midtown Pediatrics
  • Vestavia Pediatrics
    • If you have an urgent medical question that cannot wait until we open, please call our answering service at 205-930-4310 and a nurse will call you back. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911.

Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021 – 8:25 a.m.

The following locations will open at noon on Tuesday, Feb. 16. Updates will be posted here if the offices modify their posted opening times plans due to changing weather conditions.

  • Over the Mountain Pediatrics
  • Midtown Pediatrics
  • Pediatrics West (Bessemer and McAdory)
  • Pell City Pediatrics
  • Mayfair Medical Group
    • If you have an urgent matter, please call Mayfair’s answering service at 205-930-4263 to speak with a nurse or doctor on call.

Monday, Feb. 15, 2021 – 3 p.m.

Due to possible inclement weather conditions on Tuesday morning, Feb. 16, outpatient clinics at Children’s of Alabama, Children’s on 3rd, Children’s on Lakeshore and Children’s South will open at 1:00 p.m.

Children’s South Surgery will be closed Tuesday, Feb. 16.

All surgical services at Children’s downtown Russell Campus will continue as scheduled.

As always Children’s Emergency Department remains open, and anyone experiencing an emergency should dial 911.

Outpatient clinics are attempting to reach appointments by telephone today and will try to work in all patients that arrive tomorrow. Please call 205-638-6200 to reschedule if you are unable to keep your appointment. 

Children's

Urgent Care or Emergency Department?

When your child needs quick medical care, in some cases, it’s hard to determine whether you should go to an urgent care center or to the emergency department  (ED). Before making that important decision, here are some things to consider.

Urgent Care Center Treatment
Urgent care centers can manage the same problems as your regular health care provider when your child is sick. These centers also can provide services like X-rays, stitches and splints. If you can’t get to your provider’s office or it’s after regular office hours, you can get medical care at an urgent care center.

In addition, urgent care centers can also treat:

•            simple bone injuries

•            minor burns

•            cuts

•            splinter removal

•            sprains and other sports injuries

•            minor animal bites

•            fever

•            belly pain

•            vomiting or diarrhea

Visiting the ED

The ED is equipped to handle more serious problems, like Children’s of Alabama Emergency Department, which is prepared for life-threatening illnesses and injuries at any time of the day or night..

You should go to the ED if your child experiences any of the following:

•            trouble breathing

•            unusual sleepiness or confusion or cannot awaken

•            a stiff neck with a fever

•            a continuous fast heartbeat

•            ingested a poison, drug or unknown substance

•            a head injury and is vomiting

•            an eye injury

•            a serious burn

•            a fever in a child less than six weeks old (although certain types of fevers in older children may be able to be seen elsewhere)

Some situations are so serious that you need the help of trained medical personnel on the way to the hospital and need to call 911 immediately.

Call 911 if your child:

•            isn’t breathing or is turning blue

•            is unconscious after a fall

•            is having a seizure

•            has a serious allergic reaction

•            has a broken bone that sticks out through the skin 

•            took an unknown amount of medicine and is now hard to rouse

•            is choking

•            has a large cut that won’t stop bleeding

So, what happens when you first arrive at the ED? “In the Emergency Department, children are seen first by a triage nurse who does a medical assessment as to the severity of illness,” said Kathy Monroe, M.D., MSQI, and attending physician in pediatric emergency medicine at Children’s of Alabama. “Children with severe illnesses are seen right away, while others may have a wait time according to the severity of their illness,” she said.

Additional Things to Consider

Whether you are going to an urgent care center or an ED, you should know the name and number of your child’s primary care provider, your child’s medical history and the details of your child’s current medical concern. And it’s good to know the name and number of the pharmacy where you usually get your prescriptions filled.

Here is what you should include in child’s medical history:

•            medicines your child is taking

•            allergies

•            history of previous hospitalizations

•            any previous surgeries

•            illnesses

•            relevant family history

•            immunization history

When giving the details of your child’s current medical concern, be sure to include:

•            when the problem began (the time of injury or how many days your child has been sick)

•            the symptoms of the current illness or injury

•            treatments and medicines you have already tried

•            when your child last had anything to eat or drink

Dr. Monroe said, “Parents should definitely check with their child’s pediatrician for guidance when making decisions about urgent care, emergency care or a doctor’s office. Planning ahead is important for any situation.”

The Children’s of Alabama ED is located at 1601 5th Avenue South in downtown Birmingham. Around-the-clock valet services are provided at no charge for patient families at the corner of 5th Avenue South and 16th Street.

Children's

Can Children and Teens Take the COVID-19 Vaccine?

So far, the COVID-19 vaccine is recommended only for people 16 and older. It’s not yet approved for children younger than that. That’s because the first safety trials didn’t include younger age groups. As safety trials continue, researchers will know more about whether the vaccine is safe and works well in younger age groups. You can find the latest vaccine information by checking the CDC’s website.

Doctors, nurses, and health workers are taking the vaccine already. Soon it will be available for the public. When it is, healthy people over age 16 can take it. Experts predict that will happen by spring 2021.

So what’s the best way to protect your family? Keep doing the things you’re already doing:

  • Wear a mask.
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from people you don’t live with.
  • Avoid crowds.
  • Wash your hands well and often with soap and water or use hand sanitizer.
  • Try not to touch your nose, mouth, or eyes unless you know your hands are clean.

For more on COVID-19, please visit our website.

Children's

Talking to Children about the News

Children hear about what’s going on in the world through social media, friends, or adults’ conversations. Sometimes the news is uplifting — like kids their age taking a stand on social or environmental issues. Other times, children may worry about current events and need an adult to help make sense of what’s happening.

Help your child understand the news and feel more at ease by taking these steps:

Find Out What Your Child Already Knows

  • Ask your kids questions to see if they know about a current event. For school-age kids and teens, you can ask what they have heard at school or on social media.
  • Consider your child’s age and development. Younger kids may not grasp the difference between fact and fantasy. Most kids realize the news is real by the time they are 7 or 8 years old.
  • Follow your child’s lead. If your child doesn’t seem interested in an event or doesn’t want to talk about it at the moment, don’t push.


Answer Questions Honestly and Briefly

  • Tell the truth but share only as much as your child needs to know. Try to calm any fears and help kids feel safe. Don’t offer more details than your child is interested in.
  • Listen carefully. For some kids, hearing about an upsetting event or natural disaster might make them worry, “Could I be next? Could that happen to me?” Older kids may have lots of questions. Focus on what your kids ask so you can help them cope with their fears. An adult’s willingness to listen sends a powerful message.
  • It’s OK to say you don’t know the answer. If your child asks a question that stumps you, say you’ll find out. Or use age-appropriate websites to spend time together looking for an answer.

Help Kids Feel in Control

  • Encourage your child to talk. If your child is afraid about what’s going on, ask about it. Even when kids can’t control an event — like a natural disaster — it can help them to share their fears with you.
  • Urge teens to look beyond a news story. Ask why they think an outlet featured a frightening or disturbing story. Was it to boost ratings and clicks or because the story was truly newsworthy? In this way, a scary story can be turned into a discussion about the role and mission of the news.
  • Teach your children to be prepared, not panicked. For example, if the news is about a natural disaster, make a family plan for what you might do. If an illness is spreading, talk about ways to protect yourself and others.
  • Talk about what you can do to help. After a tragic event, finding ways to help can give kids a sense of control. Look for news stories that highlight what other people are doing.
  • Put news stories in context. Broaden the discussion from a specific news item about a difficult event to a larger conversation. Use it as a way to talk about helping, cooperation, and the ways that people cope with hardship.

Limit Exposure to the News

  • Decide what and how much news is appropriate for your child. Think about how old your kids are and how mature they are. Encourage them to take breaks from following the news, especially when the topics are difficult.
  • Keep tabs on the amount of difficult news your child hears. Notice how often you discuss the news in front of your kids. Turn off the TV so the news is not playing in the background all day.
  • Set limits. It’s OK to tell your kids that you don’t want them to have constant exposure and to set ground rules on device and social media use.
  • Watch the news with your child and talk about it. Turn off a story if you think it’s not appropriate for your child.

Keep the Conversation Going

  • Talk about current events with your child often. Help kids think through stories they hear – good and bad. Ask questions like: “What do you think about these events?” or “How do you think these things happen?” With these types of questions, you can encourage conversation about non-news topics.
  • Watch for stress. If your child shows changes in behavior (such as not sleeping or eating, not wanting to be around people, or worrying all the time), call your child’s doctor or a behavioral health care provider. They can help your child manage anxiety and feel better able to cope.