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Children's, Nutrition

Eating Healthy During a Pandemic

By: Rainie Robinson, pediatric nutritionist MyPlateInfographic

Having the entire family home all day during the COVID-19 pandemic can present many challenges. One of those challenges is maintaining a healthy diet. Eating fruits and vegetables is crucial to ensure our bodies are getting needed vitamins, minerals and fiber.

In some cases, fresh fruits and vegetables may be a little more difficult to find in stores. When they are available, remember to use those items first before they spoil. You can also freeze most fresh fruits and vegetables in an airtight container for approximately three months. In addition to fresh produce, frozen and canned vegetables can also provide the nutrition that we need.

If fresh produce is not available, frozen is a great option because items are frozen at peak freshness. When buying frozen produce, be sure to check the ingredients list below the nutrition facts label. Choose items that only list the fruit or vegetable to avoid added sugars and salt.

Canned items like meat or vegetables can also be good options. Just remember to look for no added salt or reduced sodium versions. Draining and rinsing canned food items can remove up to 40%  of sodium. When choosing canned meat, try to use fresher varieties like chicken or tuna and avoid potted meat types like Vienna sausages as they are higher in preservatives.

Additionally, try to avoid junk foods like chips and snack cakes. These items can be appealing because of their long shelf life but are devoid of nutrition and have large amounts of salt, sugar and preservatives that can make you feel sluggish.

In the end, remember that there are no good or bad foods. Sometimes creating a balanced meal means relying on what your family has available. Give yourself grace during trying times and know that you are doing what you can to feed your family well!

Children's, Health and Safety

Maintaining Your Child’s Heath During Social Distancing

youngblood_gigiMaintaining your child’s regular medical care is still important while sheltering in place. Dr. Gigi Youngblood of Pediatrics East offers tips for parents and caregivers.

Well Child Check Ups

“If your child is due for immunizations, and everyone in your home is well, plan to keep your well check up unless otherwise instructed by your pediatrician. Most offices have changed the flow of the office to minimize risk of exposure to you and your child,” Youngblood said.

Only one caregiver (no other family members, including siblings) should bring your child in to see the pediatrician. The nurses and doctors will be wearing masks, and possibly goggles and gowns, as we come to see you. The youngest patients, particularly those in need of immunizations and well visits, will typically be scheduled during the morning hours and will be seen in rooms that have been designated for well visits only.

But, when in doubt, contact your pediatrician to discuss details specific for your situation. “While there are risks of leaving home for a check up, there are also significant risks if large numbers of children get behind on vaccinations,” Youngblood said.

Chronic Health Conditions 

 If your child is not due for immunizations but has chronic health conditions such as asthma, allergies, ADHD or eczema, a telehealth visit may be a good option. “A telehealth visit might be a great way to check in and ensure your child is getting good symptom control and optimal management,” Youngblood said.

Insurance coverage for telehealth visits varies, although many insurance providers are currently covering telehealth visits at little or no cost to the patient, Youngblood said.

What if my child is sick?

 Telehealth is also an excellent way to touch base with your doctor if your child is sick. Your doctor will decide if a telehealth visit is appropriate for your child in any particular situation, but this is a great way for your doctor to assess the situation and determine the next best step.

What about an injury?

If the injury is something you would typically have seen your pediatrician for, Youngblood said, call as soon as possible to see if this is something that could be safely assessed at the office.  Some minor injuries might be safely assessed via telehealth or a video conference with your doctor.

COVID-19 Resources

For more information about your child’s health and resources related to COVID-19, please visit www.childrensal.org/coronavirus.

Children's, Health and Safety, News

Preventing Injury

SD-InjuryPrevention-1Although cases of children and infants sick with COVID-19 are not showing up in the numbers seen in adults, they are affected in other ways. Amid quarantines and school closings, some parents are forced to watch their children and work from home while others deal with the frustration of providing for their families without a steady income. This leaves children in a vulnerable position and at increased risk of injury – the No. 1 killer and cause of hospitalization among youth.

Doctors working with the Injury Free Coalition for Kids of Birmingham are on the frontlines treating injuries resulting from ATV accidents to dog bites. Children’s of Alabama Emergency Department Medical Director and University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Professor Kathy Monroe, M.D., and Children’s Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician and UAB Professor Michele Nichols, M.D., are doing all they can to raise awareness and address a likely increase in childhood injuries amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Injury prevention professionals emphasize the safety and well-being of children so that they remain injury-free.

“We must remain mindful and vigilant,” said Barbara Barlow, M.D., founder and executive director of the Injury Free Coalition for Kids. “Our sites across the country are working to find ways to help families address motor vehicle safety, home safety and the need for safe play spaces during the virus outbreak.”

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging families to help children to stay active and play outdoors, go on bike rides, and walks, but obviously while practicing social distancing,” said Injury Free Board President Lois Lee, M.D. “The CDC also says it’s important to take regular indoor activity breaks to stretch and dance as well as keep children socially connected by helping them reach out to friends and family via phone, video chats, and writing letters or cards when it is not possible to visit due to stay at home orders.”

For more information about how to keep kids safe and engaged, visit childrensal.org/coronavirus and click on the “COVID-19 KidsHealth and Resources” tab.

In addition to keeping children injury-free, the CDC offers the following tips to help families stay healthy and virus-free:

• Cleaning hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer
• Avoid people who are sick (coughing and sneezing)
• Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces daily in household common areas (e.g. tables, hard-backed chairs, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, sinks)
• Launder items including washable plush toys as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. If possible, launder items using the warmest appropriate water setting for the items and dry items completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.

Cold-like symptoms such as fever, runny nose, cough, shortness of breath, vomiting and diarrhea have been associated with COVID-19 in children and are reasons for contacting primary care providers.

About Injury Free Coalition for Kids
The Injury Free Coalition for Kids is among the country’s most effective injury prevention programs. It is a national program developed with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation comprised of hospital-based, community-oriented programs whose efforts are anchored in research, education and advocacy. Currently, the Coalition includes more than 30 sites located in just as many cities, each housed in the trauma center of their participating institution. It is run under the guidance of a board comprised of Coalition members and approved by the organization, operated by a set of bylaws established by the governing board.

Children's, Health and Safety

Parenting During a Pandemic

“During a pandemic, risk factors for child abuse and neglect like parental stress due to finances and instability increase,” said Deb Schneider, director of Children’s Hospital Intervention and Prevention Services (CHIPS) Center at Children’s of Alabama. Now that schools and childcare centers are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s important to make plans to keep kids busy at home. Advance planning and working together can help reduce stress in the household.

Parenting During a Pandemic

  • Establish a routine to help children cope with anxiety
  • Limit children’s access to news and social media related to the pandemic.
  • Never discipline a child when you are angry.
  • If you, the parent/caregiver, are experiencing stress and anxiety, take a break. Call a friend or family member.
  • Family activities like walking, playing card games and working puzzles help ease stress.
  • Give children access to art supplies and music as alternatives to screen time

Being away from friends, extended family and social activities can be hard on teens and kids. To help them stay connected,  set up FaceTime or Skype playdates or visits.

Recognizing and Reporting Abuse

While kids are currently out of school due to the COVID-19 pandemic,  experts at Children’s of Alabama want to remind you of the importance of recognizing and reporting abuse of any kind.

“By learning common types of abuse and what you can do, you can make a huge difference in a child’s life,” Schneider said. “The earlier abused children get help, the greater chance they have to heal from their abuse and not perpetuate the cycle.”

The four types of child abuse are:
• Physical Abuse
• Sexual Abuse
• Emotional Abuse
• Neglect

The signs of child abuse vary depending on the type of abuse, but there are some common indicators.

Warning signs of emotional abuse in children:
• Excessively withdrawn, fearful or anxious about doing something wrong
•  Extremes in behavior (extremely compliant or extremely demanding; extremely passive or extremely aggressive)
• Doesn’t seem to be attached to the parent or caregiver
• Acts either inappropriately adult (taking care of other children) or inappropriately infantile (rocking, thumb sucking, tantrums)

Warning signs of physical abuse in children:
• Frequent injuries or unexplained bruises, welts or cuts
• Is always watchful and “on alert,” as if waiting for something bad to happen
• Injuries appear to have a pattern such as marks from a hand or belt
• Shies away from touch, flinches at sudden movements or seems afraid to go home
• Wears inappropriate clothing to cover up injuries,i.e.  long-sleeved shirts on hot days

Warning signs of neglect in children:
• Clothes are ill-fitting, filthy or inappropriate for the weather
• Hygiene is consistently bad (unbathed, matted and unwashed hair, noticeable body odor)
• Untreated illnesses and physical injuries
• Is frequently unsupervised or left alone or allowed to play in unsafe situations and environments
• Is frequently late or missing from school

Warning signs of sexual abuse in children:
• Trouble walking or sitting
• Displays knowledge or interest in sexual acts inappropriate to his or her age, or even seductive behavior
• Makes strong efforts to avoid a specific person without an obvious reason
• Doesn’t want to change clothes in front of others or participate in physical activities

Supervision is important. Know where your children are. Make sure children know sexual abuse is never their fault and that they won’t be in any trouble if they tell.

Help for Alabama’s abused children is available at the CHIPS Center. The CHIPS Center provides forensic medical evaluations, psychosocial assessments, play therapy, counseling for non-offending caregivers and other support services. All counseling and preventive services are free. If you suspect a child has been or is being abused,   please contact your county Department of Human Resources or  call the CHIPS Center at Children’s by dialing 205-638-2751. For more information,  visit childrensal.org/CHIPS.

Children's, Health and Safety

HAND SANITIZER: KEEPING LITTLE HANDS CLEAN AND SAFE

Hand Sanitizer

Door knobs. Stair rails. Elevator buttons. Just the thought of touching any of those during cold and flu season and now coronavirus may send you running for the nearest bottle of hand sanitizer. Hand sanitizer is a convenient way to keep your hands clean and germ-free, but parents should be aware of the potential harm it can cause.

“There are times when you don’t have access to good old-fashioned soap and water to wash your hands,” said Ann Slattery, director of the Alabama Poison Information Center at Children’s of Alabama. “Using hand sanitizer is an easy way to stay healthy when you’re on the go, but it’s not without its own inherent danger because it contains alcohol.”

In order to be most effective against germs and viruses a hand sanitizer must contain  60 to 95 percent alcohol, and many formulas contain a stronger alcohol concentration than most hard liquors. Just 1 ounce of hand sanitizer – most are greater than 60 percent – has the same alcohol content as a 12 ounce can of beer. Therefore, accidental ingestion or intentional misuse of hand sanitizer is cause for concern.

“From a young child’s perspective, hand sanitizer may smell good, and it’s usually in brightly colored, glittery bottles,” Slattery said. “With older children, there are reports of them daring others to drink it.”

“The number of reported cases of hand sanitizer exposure in Alabama has grown since 2011. That year, there were 159 exposure calls to the Alabama Poison Information Center involving hand sanitizer. In 2019 the APIC documented almost 300 hand sanitizer poison exposures in Alabama,” Slattery said. Nationally, there were nearly 20,000 reported hand sanitizer exposure cases in 2018.

To prevent potentially harmful exposure to hand sanitizer:

  • Keep hand sanitizer well out of reach of children at all times.
  • Children should use hand sanitizer only with adult supervision.
  • Apply a dime-sized amount of sanitizer to dry hands and rub together until completely dry.

If you suspect your child may have ingested any amount of hand sanitizer, Slattery encourages parents to call Alabama Poison Information Center at 1-800-222-1222 immediately. The signs won’t always be as obvious as an empty bottle lying around. “When in doubt, check it out,” she said.

Some potential symptoms of harmful exposure to hand sanitizer include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Stumbling
  • Falling

Some delayed symptoms could include a drop in blood sugar and a drop in body temperature.

The Alabama Poison Information Center’s hotline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week always free and confidentially. Established in 1958, The Alabama Poison Information Center at Children’s of Alabama receives more than 50,000 poison calls annually, plus makes more than 60,000 follow-up calls. For more information, visit https://www.childrensal.org/apic

Children's, News

Perspectives of COVID-19 from a Pediatric Psychologist

By Dan Marullo, Ph.D.

With COVID-19 being declared a pandemic, we are now tasked to change our personal and collective behavior. It is understandable that many will experience fear, anxiety and anger in the coming days and weeks. This is normal and certainly a typical reaction to a crisis. However, whether we respond with grace or with terror is in our individual and collective control.

It is normal to be afraid. It is OK to acknowledge that fear and to take steps to cope with anxiety. Please consider the following:

  1. Fear of the unknown is normal. We are each subject to feeling a host of emotions such as anxiety, worry, irritability and sadness. We can also experience poor sleep or appetite, trouble with concentration, a tendency to withdraw from other people and perhaps even feeling hopeless. These can be normal reactions to the situation and it helps to recognize this in ourselves and in others. For example, recognizing that your spouse or child is uncharacteristically moody or snappish may mean that they are feeling overwhelmed and need support. Certainly, anyone feeling suicidal may need immediate attention.
  • Seek reliable information. There is much that we still do not know about COVID-19 and that alone increases fear and anxiety. Gaining reliable information is key to addressing this uncertainty. Reputable websites for updates and information include the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization. Websites for good psychological information related to COVID-19 include the American Psychological Association and the American Psychiatric Association.
  • Practice self-care. Because we are all susceptible to emotional distress, it becomes more important to take care of ourselves physically and emotionally. This may be complicated by social distancing given that social activities are commonly used by people to cope. We may not be able to attend religious services, go to work or school, the gym, shopping and so on. However, we can adapt and remain connected. Many churches are hosting online services, you can exercise at home using YouTube classes, and so on. A few things to keep in mind:
    • Maintain a typical routine as much as possible. Try having your kids do schoolwork at home at the times they would at school. Do the same if you are working from home.
    • Take a media/social media break. Depending on what you read or watch, COVID-19 is either the world’s biggest hoax or the end of the world. Neither is true. Seek accurate information and take a break from all the chatter.
    • Social distance does not mean social isolation. We may not be able to go out, have play dates or travel, but we can maintain contact with family and friends via Facetime and other platforms. This is especially critical for our most vulnerable family and friends, those that must be on isolation because of health concerns such as the elderly and those with underlying medical conditions.
    • Consider volunteering in some way. The simple act of giving has been shown to reduce distress in the giver. It is gratifying to see people organizing food drives and other activities to support their communities.
    • Find ways to maintain your spirits. A good sense of humor goes a long way. Our Italian brothers and sisters are singing from their balconies in defiance of their isolation. People are amazing. Find your path.
  • Be a role model. Our children are watching how we react to this crisis. What do you want them to see? Children and teens rely on the adults in their lives to model and teach behavior. A child’s coping often relies on how adults cope. Now is the time to teach resilience, compassion, self-sacrifice and healthy coping. These are lessons children will remember for the rest of their lives. We adults should manage our emotions and fears, and be the leaders our children need us to be.
  • Support our children. Our children are responding to this crisis as well and need support during this time. How children cope and what they need varies by their age and level of development. For example, small children respond to the distress around them and need comforting and security. School aged children, tweens and teens need information that is tailored to their age (Younger children need the basic facts, older kids can deal with more detail and abstraction). Recognize that a change in behavior may be a sign of distress and an opportunity to engage and support. Please consider:
    • Maintaining a typical routine as much as possible. This includes schoolwork, bedtimes and mealtimes.
    • Giving age-appropriate information and answering questions honestly.
    • Monitoring use of TV and other media, particularly if your child is constantly looking at COVID-19-related content (Remember, bad information is scary).
    • Providing opportunities for kids to give and contribute. Help them organize a food drive or a video chat with nursing home patients. This promotes a sense of engagement and teaches resilience.
    • Managing your own emotions. Remember, our kids are watching. What do you want them to learn?
  • Acknowledge and recognize grief. Many of us are experiencing loss and uncertainty and it is OK to acknowledge that fact. As this process unfolds, we may lose people we love, jobs that we depend on, perhaps even that sense of safety that we once enjoyed. Coming to terms with loss is necessary and healthy. Now is the time for each of us to reach out as individuals and as a community to support one another, in small ways and in large.
  • Look for the lesson. I, like many of you, have experienced tragedy in my life. From that experience I have learned valuable lessons. I have learned much about myself and what I value and treasure. I do not know what lessons each of us may learn from this pandemic, but I do know there is something of value to learn if we leave ourselves open.

As I conclude this message, I feel a tremendous sense of community and hope. In some perverse way, this event has given all of us a “time out.” Perhaps this is our time to reflect, reconnect with others and remember what is truly of value in this life. I wish you all well.

Dan Marullo, Ph.D., is a pediatric psychologist and neuropsychologist at Children’s of Alabama and the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Children's, Health and Safety

Preventing Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes

Annual pre-participation physicals can help prevent cardiac arrest in young athletes.  Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs.  This can cause sudden cardiac death in a matter of minutes.

Signs of  Cardiac Arrest

  • sudden collapse
  • no pulse
  • no breathing
  • loss of consciousness

Cardiac arrest is possible to survive if the child receives immediate medical care via  cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or  an automated external defibrillator (AED), a device that delivers an electrical shock to help the heart re-establish an effective rhythm.

Medical Conditions That Can Lead to Cardiac Arrest

  • heart disease
  • heart attack
  • enlarged heart
  • electrical problems in the heart
  • electrical shock
  • an injury to the heart at the wrong moment in  the heart’s cycle

Other Risk Factors

  • health supplements
  • energy drinks
  • illegal drug use
  • not being truthful about medical conditions

Barbara Mostella, RN,  Pediatric Cardiology Clinic supervisor at  the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Children’s of Alabama, said it is important for young athletes to have an annual medical exam by a physician  before playing sports. “Even though any young person can have a cardiac arrest, athletes are at a higher risk with competitive exercise if there is an underlying heart condition.”

Children’s  and UAB Pediatric Cardiology established Alabama LifeStart  to encourage schools  to have AEDs readily available and  establish an emergency action plan with trained personnel. “The preventive measures encouraged during this initiative provides the school staff with a means to help save a child’s life in the event of a cardiac arrest,” Mostella said.

A Preventive Checklist

  • Annual Medical Exams
    • In Alabama, the state requires high school athletes to have an annual medical exam/pre-participation physical by a physician. A physician who knows your child’s medical history is the best person to perform  the exam. If you choose to use a school sports physician, the medical report should be sent to your child’s regular pediatrician to review and keep on file with their medical records.
    • A screening or medical form questionnaire is also required and should be completed truthfully. The screening includes questions about your child’s medical and family history. 
  • Symptoms – if these occur during or after exercise, they should not be ignored and evaluated immediately by a medical professional
    • tiredness
    • unusual shortness of breath
    • dizziness
    • fainting
    • chest pain
    • rapid heartbeat
    • seizures
  • Treatment
  • If symptoms occur, special tests may be required (electrocardiogram or EKG, echocardiogram, stress test, etc.) to determine if there is a heart condition.
  • Follow-up and care as needed with a physician/cardiologist if abnormalities are found.
Children's

Vitamins

Should your child take vitamins to stay healthy? There are many multi-vitamins marketed for kids, including fruit flavored gummy vitamins, but are they necessary?

 

Jeana Jackson, Nutrition Director at Children’s of Alabama says because vitamins are stored in the body, eating a variety of different food groups is all that is necessary. “The good news is generally most of our patients will get all of the vitamins and minerals they need from a healthy and well-balanced diet.” Jackson says.

If your child is a picky eater and you have concerns about whether they are getting enough variety in their diet, Jackson recommends talking to your child’s pediatrician about their nutrition. In this case she says a multi-vitamin may do the trick.

There are other instances when vitamins are recommended. “Babies that are exclusively breast fed need vitamin supplementation from their first few days of life because breast milk is low in Vitamin D”, Jackson says.  She also says a child’s pediatrician may recommend supplementation in the instance of diseases like Crohn’s or Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend a multi-vitamin for children. However, Jackson says if a parent chooses to give their child a multivitamin, they are generally safe. She recommends against a large dose of vitamins that may cause problems with nutrient absorption of other vitamins and minerals. An example of this would be a C vitamin that doses well beyond the Recommended Dietary Allowance.

Children's

Bronchiolitis

 

bronc pic

 

Bronchiolitis is a lung infection that can be common in young children and infants. It causes bronchioles (small airways in the lung) to get inflamed and congested. The sickness is usually caused by a virus, which infects the smallest airways in the lungs. The bronchioles become inflamed and produce mucus, which causes difficulty breathing.  It is most common during winter months. The symptoms begin like a cold and then progress to wheezing, coughing, and difficulty breathing. Symptoms can last a few weeks to a month. Normally, children can heal at home without requiring hospitalization.

Symptoms

  • Coughing
  • Runny nose
  • Stuffy nose
  • Low grade fever
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Whistling noise when the child breathes

 

Causes

Most cases of bronchiolitis are caused by the by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). RSV is very common and infects almost every child by the age of 2. Outbreaks of the virus occur every winter. The virus can be spread easily through droplets in the air when someone with RSV coughs, sneezes, or talks. It can also be spread by touching shared objects such as door handles, toys or utensils and then touching your eyes, nose, or mouth.

 

Risk Factors

Infants younger than the age of 3 are at the greatest risk of getting RSV because their immune systems are not fully developed.

Other factors include:

  • A depressed immune system
  • A child with a heart or lung condition
  • Exposure to tobacco smoke
  • Contact with multiple children
  • Siblings who attend school

 

 

When to see a doctor

Call the doctor if your child has the following symptoms:

  • Difficulty eating, swallowing, or drinking
  • Breathing becomes rapid and shallow
  • Vomiting
  • Skin turns pale
  • Sluggish appearance

Call 911 or take your child to the nearest emergency room if your child has the following symptoms:

  • Respiratory distress
  • Lethargic appearance
  • Skin turns blue

 

Prevention and Treatment

The best prevention for bronchiolitis is washing your hands frequently; especially before touching a child when you’ve had a respiratory illness. If your child has bronchiolitis, keep them home until they are well to prevent the spreading of the infection.

More prevention tips: Don’t allow children to share drinking glasses or utensils with others, teach children to cover their coughs and sneezes and Disinfect surfaces in your home.

Vaccines and Medication

There are no vaccines for the most common forms of RSV, but an annual flu shot is recommended for everyone over 6 months old.

Children's

PERTUSSIS-THE 100 DAY COUGH

Whoop image.jpg

Cold and flu are not the only illnesses that may be approaching this fall and winter. Outbreaks of Pertussis, better known as ‘whooping cough,’ also occur more often during cold and flu season. Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory illness caused by the spread of a bacteria called Bordetella pertussis. Pertussis causes swelling of the airways, leading to a violent “whoop sounding” cough.   This cough has been known to last up to 10 weeks or more. Although pertussis can affect people of all ages, it can be life-threatening for infants. According to the Centers for Disease Control, children are at a greater risk of getting pertussis. About 50% of children under the age of 1 infected with pertussis require hospitalization. The best way to prevent Pertussis is to get the DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis) vaccine.

Signs and Symptoms

In the early stages, pertussis may appear to be a common cold. Symptoms may include:

  • Runny nose
  • Low-grade fever
  • Occasional cough
  • Pauses in breathing (in infants)

Symptoms after having Pertussis for 1-2 weeks may include:

  • Multiple rapid coughs followed by a high-pitched “whoop” sound. This cough often occurs at night.
  • Vomiting during or after coughing
  • Exhaustion after coughing

Prevention

  • Use tissues to cover the mouth and nose when sneezing or coughing.
  • Throw away tissues after use.
  • Cough and sneeze into your upper sleeve or bend of the elbow to help keep the hands clean.
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Use hand sanitizer throughout the day
  • Vaccinate your child.  9 out of 10 children are fully protected from the virus after receiving the vaccine.
  • DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis) vaccine for babies and children
  • TDaP (Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis) booster shot for preteens, teens, and adults
  • Pregnant women may receive the TDaP vaccine between 27-36 weeks of pregnancy.

For more information about vaccinations regarding pertussis and other diseases, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/vaccines.html

To schedule your appointment for pertussis vaccination, please visit https://www.childrensal.org/HowtomakeAppointments