Browsing Tag

Communication

Children's, Development, Health and Safety

Communication Begins at Birth: 12 – 24 Months

This year-long period is when language development truly takes off. Your child’s understanding of the world around them, especially for language and sounds, is much more developed than before. Most kids typically say their first words around their first birthday, but a toddler who is actively learning to walk will commonly postpone their speech development. By two years old, most toddlers will say 50-100 words or moreand be able to put together two-word phrases.

Listed below are some typical milestones, enhancement activities, and red flags for your baby’s hearing and speech development at this age. Note that every child is different, and some reach these milestones sooner or later than others. If your child is not developing in accordance with these guidelines, consider contacting your pediatrician or family health physician. 

Typical Development: 

  • Uses several words with a variety of speech sounds, slowly developing into 20-50 words
  • Enjoys simple songs and rhymes
  • Understands two step directions (ex: “Get your shoes and come here”)
  • Can make simple needs known through speech
  • Asks simple questions
  • Knows and points to body parts

Activities: 

  • Praise and encourage efforts in all areas: moving, playing, talking, singing
  • Avoid over-correcting your child’s efforts to speak
  • Always fully listen when your child speaks to you
  • Ask your child questions that stimulate thought and check understanding

Red Flags: 

  • Uses only vowel sounds to speak
  • Cannot follow simple commands
  • Does not respond to sounds or responds only to loud sounds
  • Points or grunts to make needs known

Your little one is listening to everything you say and storing it away at an incredible rate. Instead of using “baby” words, start using the correct names for people, places, and things. Speak slowly and clearly, and keep it simple. Your child’s vocabulary will grow quickly, but pronunciation isn’t likely to keep pace. By 2 years of age, most kids are understandable only about half the time, so emphasize the correct pronunciations in your responses.

Gestures are an important part of language development. Make the connection between the gestures your child makes and language by using a running commentary such as, “Do you want a drink?” (when your child points to the refrigerator), then wait for a response. Then say, “What do you want? Milk? OK, let’s get some milk.” Such behavior encourages kids to respond and participate in conversations

Children’s of Alabama Hearing and Speech Center: https://www.childrensal.org/hearing-and-speech 

Children's, Development, Health and Safety

Communication Begins at Birth: 4 – 8 Months

During these months, your baby is learning to talk with lots of babbling and laughing. They are discovering a new range of sounds as well as imitating some of those sounds. They will also start to understand different tones of voice and respond accordingly.

Having a “conversation” with your baby is as important as ever during this time. Surprisingly, babies comprehend words long before they can say them, so use real words and cut back on the baby talk.

Listed below are some typical milestones, enhancement activities and red flags for your baby’s hearing and speech development at this age. Note that every child is different, and some reach these milestones sooner or later than others. If your child is not achieving these developmental milestones, consider contacting your pediatrician or family health physician.

Typical Development:

  • Turns head to locate sounds beyond what able to see
  • Notices toys make sounds
  • Shows interest and pleasure when spoken to
  • Responds to different tones and sounds but not upset
  • Calms by favorite sounds
  • Begins to repeat sounds (such as “ooh,” “ahh,” and “ba-ba”)
  • Responds to name when called
  • Makes sounds to get attention
  • Shouts to gain attention
  • Understands “no-no” and “bye-bye”

Red Flags:

  • Does not laugh or smile
  • Makes little noise
  • Does not respond to sound or responds only to loud sounds
  • Does not interact vocally by making sounds or makes sounds only in monotones

Activities:

  • Call baby by name
  • Play vocal and simple games like peek-a-boo
  • Talk about activities during play
  • Make play sounds and wait for response: taking turns
  • Name body parts while playing and dressing
  • Read to your baby

By the end of eight months, you can expect a lot of progression in your baby’s ability to listen and talk. They will respond to their names, respond to sounds by making their own, babble repetitive consonants, imitate sounds and even associate words with familiar objects. Reinforce this progress by introducing your baby to simple words that apply to everyday life. They understand more that you think!