Monthly Archives

October 2018

Children's, Health and Safety

Tips for New Parents

Bringing your new baby home is one of the most exciting moments in a new parent’s life, but there are a few tips you must keep in mind to ensure their safety.

Placement of the crib

  • Should be a safe distance away from any window or furniture.
  • Should be away from all cords (blinds, electrical cords)

Smoke and carbon monoxide alarms

  • Have a working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms
  • If an alarm goes off, grab your baby and exit the house right away.
  • Call 911 and do not re-enter the house until the fire department says it is safe.
  • If your baby becomes drowsy or abnormally fussy, seek medical attention right away.

Car Seat Installation

  • Choose a car seat that is the right size for your child
  • Read your car seat’s manual and car manual to ensure it is installed correctly
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infant car seats should be rear facing until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by the car seat manufacturer.

Items in your baby’s crib

  • Crib should contain a firm mattress and fitted sheet only
  • Do not place blankets or stuffed animals in the crib
  • Infants should be placed on their back for naps and bedtime

Water heater temperature

  • Set your water heater no higher than 120 degrees to avoid the risk of burns.
  • Test water temperature by placing your elbow into the bath water.

 

 

For more information and resources, please visit https://www.safekids.org/

Children's, Health and Safety

Fire Prevention Week

Every year, most deaths due to a fire occur in the home.  Your family should have a fire escape plan in case of an emergency, and know what to do if you or your child are burned.

Fire prevention

The first step in fire safety is prevention. Look for possible fire hazards in your home, such as:

  • Light bulbs with the incorrect wattage
  • Overused extension cords
  • Overloading an outlet
  • Electrical appliances being in poor condition with frayed cables or wires
  • Portable heaters
  • Cigarettes, matches and candles
  • Grease spills
  • Appliances accidently left plugged in

 

Smoke Alarms and Fire Extinguishers

Having a smoke detector cuts the risk for fatalities in half by alerting residents when there is smoke present. Every bedroom and level of your home should have a smoke detector on the ceiling or high on the wall. Check the batteries often to make sure they are working.

Fire extinguishers can help you put out a fire before it gets too big to handle. There should be a fire extinguisher on each floor and in the kitchen. They work best when the flame is small and in a contained area. The National Fire Protection Association says to remember the word PASS when using an extinguisher:

  • Pull the pin. Release the lock with the nozzle pointing away from you.
  • Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.
  • Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.
  • Sweep the nozzle from side to side.

Creating a safety plan

Your family should have a safety plan to ensure that you are exiting your home quickly, while still being safe. Make sure every family member is aware of exits, doors and windows, and that they can be opened easily. Make sure your children can open them on their own in the event you cannot help them. You should practice fire drills with your family; know how to get out of the house and where to meet outside. Your meeting place should be a safe distance away from the house, such as the mailbox. Once you are out safely, you must not go back inside for any reason.

First Aid

If a family member gets burned:

  • Remove the heat source and any clothing from the burned area.
  • A first-degree burn will leave skin pink or red, with no blisters or raw areas.
  • A second degree burn will have blisters and clear drainage.
  • A third-degree burn can look charred or leathery.
  • Run cool water over the area for three to five minutes, then cover it with a clean cloth.
  • Never place ice on a burn.
  • Keep the burn elevated and call for emergency medical assistance if needed.