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Button Battery Dangers

Parents of small children are usually on-guard against potential choking hazards, but one item that is often overlooked is the button battery or disc battery. These batteries are about the size of a quarter or smaller and pose a dangerous risk to children if ingested.

Ann Slattery is the managing director of the Regional Poison Control Center at Children’s of Alabama. She says they have received 60 calls related to disc batteries in the last three years. Thankfully none resulted in a fatality, but swallowing a disc battery can be extremely dangerous. Not only do they pose a choking hazard, but they can result in actual burns resulting in tissue damage and internal bleeding. When ingestion occurs, it’s crucial for the child to have an X-Ray to determine where the battery is located and if surgery is needed.

Between 1985-2009, more than 56,000 disc battery ingestions were reported to the National Poison Data System. Because these batteries are small, often hidden, and used in so many devices, they can often be overlooked. “These are in so many different products,” Slattery says. “They are in greeting cards, remotes, hearing aids and watches, even in children’s toys so they might get ahold of them.”

More often than not, the parent did not see the ingestion of the battery. Slattery says it’s important to recognize the symptoms. The symptoms of possible poisoning by ingesting a disc battering include coughing, choking, loss of appetite, irritability, and fever.

Slattery says in some cases of ingestion, if the battery is small and moved beyond the esophagus, it may pass uneventfully through the rest of the digestive system and pass within a matter of days. “However if it’s lodged in the esophagus, it is considered an emergency and requires immediate removal,” she says.

It’s important for parents to supervise their children and be aware of what they are playing with, and to think ‘does that have a battery inside?’

If you suspect your child has swallowed a disc battery, call the poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If it’s an obvious medical emergency, call 911.

Oncology School Liaison Helps Patients Return to School with Ease

School is one of the most important parts of a child’s life. Continuing to keep up academically and stay connected with classmates is important for all children diagnosed with cancer or a blood disorder. Sometimes it is difficult and scary to return to school after their diagnosis and treatment or after a long hospital stay. The struggle may not always be due to medical reasons, but often the fear of classmates teasing them because of a change in appearance, worrying about keeping up with school work, or maybe feeling isolated from their peers.

The Alabama Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Disorders, is a partnership between Children’s of Alabama, the UAB Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, the UAB Institute for Cancer Outcomes and Survivorship, along with childhood cancer research entities, such as the National Cancer Institute and Children’s Oncology Group. The Hope and Cope Psychosocial and Education Program uses a family-centered approach to provide support and services for emotional health and well-being.

The STAR (School/Social Transition and Reentry) initiative is a service of the Hope and Cope Psychosocial and Education Program that provides patients with an education/school liaison who maintains ongoing communication between the medical team, the child’s school and their family. This helps the student return to a more normal lifestyle and to feel comfortable going back to school.

 

“We help facilitate the patient’s reentry to school when the oncologist medically releases them to return,” said Education/School Liaison Caroline Davis, MS, CSP. “Our goal in a reentry class presentation is to help the child’s classmates better understand the child’s diagnosis and cancer treatment journey, and to inform the teachers about any special accommodations the student may need in the classroom, or unique learning challenges the student may have.”

 

There are a variety of specialized services that the education/school liaison offers to the child and their family throughout their treatment and into survivorship. Here is a look at how the liaison can help.

  • Aid the familyin understanding their child’s learning needs; to understand federal and state law, and how to advocate and effectively communicate with their child’s school system.
  • Assist the parents in obtaining special education servicesor program modifications when needed, including collaborating on Individualized Education Planning (IEP) meetings.
  • Accompany the parents to school meetings in person or participate through Skype (i.e., a software application that enables users to have video-conferences over the internet).
  • Present workshopsto educate the school system about unique learning patterns of childhood cancer survivors and evidenced based recommendations.
  • Help young people stay in touchwith classmates through use of webcams until they are ready to return to school.
  • Prepare young people, parents, and teachersfor the return to school after a long absence and empower the child to better advocate for themselves.
  • Give classroom presentationsto help classmates understand and support the young person living with a serious illness.
  • Teach problem-solving skills and role playingto help the young person or family members with school adjustments.

 

Davis states, “When we go to the classroom, the child is often overwhelmed and scared about returning to school, but after we show their personalized presentation about their journey to the other students, you can see the child begin to interact with peers and be involved in the discussion. It is extremely rewarding to see such a change in their confidence and self-esteem!”

 

For information about this exceptional benefit and/or our STAR program, please contact Caroline Davis at (205) 638-5421 or csdavis@peds.uab.edu.