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Hearing and Speech Milestones

From the moment a baby is born, he or she is learning. That’s why it’s important for parents to be aware of and watch for important developmental milestones from birth the age 3. Jill Smith is the director of the Hearing and Speech Center at Children’s of Alabama. She said engaging in simple activities like talking to your baby while changing a diaper actually helps them learn to communicate. Smith said even the routine task of feeding your baby lays a foundation for speech.

 

“Those same muscles they are using to suck on the bottle are the same muscles they will use when learning to talk,” Smith said.
Crying is a form of communication for several months of a baby’s development. Babies cry to let parents know when they need something or when they are overwhelmed or tired. They can also engage in two-way “conversations,” exchanging smiles and cooing with mom or dad.
During this important developmental stage, Smith recommends parents consistently talk to their child. This may include reading to them, engaging in “conversations” with them and pointing out objects or animals when at the park or around the home.
“You can be saying, ‘Oh! There’s a bird,’ or ‘Look at our friend, the dog,’ and even though they may just be laying back in their stroller, they’re taking it all in, listening and learning,” Smith said.
Babies should begin reaching basic speech and hearing milestones as they grow:

3 Months Old

  • Smiling (responding to parent)
  • Cooing, babbling with parent

6 Months Old

  • Should understand “No”
  • Recognizes his or her name
  • Recognizes when a parent is in the room

1 Year Old

  • Should be speaking basic words like “No,” “Dada” and “Mama”

18 Months Old

  • Should be able to speak 30-50 words

2 Years Old

  • Should be able to string words together like “I don’t want,” “My ball,” and “Go outside”
  • Should have a vocabulary of 200-300 words

Children communicate at different rates just as they mature physically at different rates, but Smith said if a child is not using any words by 18 months old, parents should consult a pediatrician and request a speech evaluation.

Early speech and language skills are associated with success in reading, writing and social skills later in life. By engaging in “baby talk” with your baby, you help build a foundation for his or her future.